What is a clinical research study?

Clinical research studies are designed to help find:

Clinical studies are conducted in a series of steps, called phases. There are 4 main phases of clinical studies – phases 1 to 4, with 1 being the earliest and 4 being the latest. An earlier phase study may look at whether a medication is safe or the side effects it causes. A later phase study may look at whether a new treatment is better than existing treatments.

To assess the initial safety of a study medication in a small number of participants, usually 6-10.

To evaluate the safety further by testing it on a larger group of participants, usually 20-300, once the initial safety has been confirmed by the phase 1 study.

To assess the safety and efficacy of the study medication on an even larger number of participants, usually 300-3,000.

To find out new information about the safety and efficacy of the study medication after it has been approved by the health authorities.

Thousands of people all around the world take part in clinical research studies every year. Without them, new treatments cannot be developed.

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CREAD and CREAD 2
are global phase 3
studies.
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CREAD

Learn more about
CREAD 2
Learn more about
clinical studies.